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Rama & Sita, lovers & soul mates

The Virtue of Passionate Couple Love

  • Pursuit of desires important to fulfillment of destiny
  • Evil desires of the demons lead to their doom
  • Romantic Love in the Secular Context
  • Rama’s Insistence on Sita’s purity, a patriarchal flaw

Concept of ‘soul mates’ unique to Hindu Mythology

Rama and Sita epitomize the concept of ‘soul mates’. This notion is a major feature of Hindu mythology* The transformative power of couple love is a key feature of Hinduism’s Ramayana. The mythology of the Ramayana permeates Southeast Asian culture. The central theme of the whole story is based upon the separation of Rama and Sita and their reunion. Rama is not motivated to engage Ravana the evil Demon King in order to protect his kingdom. Nor is he consciously driven by any divine directive. The dramatic action of the tale is solely driven by their love for each other.

Pursuit of desires important to fulfillment of destiny

In the Ramayana, the passion between Rama and Sita is both a central and positive driving force in the tale. Rama’s passion for Sita inspires him to perform heroic deeds for her sake. To accomplish his task, he drives out all the demons that have enslaved both she and the gods.

Evil desires of the demons lead to their doom

While the divine desire of Rama and Sita for each other is glorified and made to be their strength, the physical desires of the demon king Ravana certainly lead to his eventual doom. Indeed for Ravana, the pursuit of desire is his fatal flaw. This is a classic Yogic, Buddhist, Taoist and Christian theme. The pursuit of desires at the expense of a divine relationship inevitably leads to disaster.

Romantic Love in the Secular Context

In our survey of cultural attitudes towards romantic love, we have yet to discuss the secular element of Western society. The transformative power of romantic love does exist in the secular context. Its roots in the West are embedded within the troubadour tradition of Western Europe. These poet minstrels are among the first to reject a love relationship based upon ecclesiastical or paternalistic authority. As such, this new notion of romantic love is deeply connected to the emerging concept of the worth of the individual human being. The minstrels’ songs often glorified the overwhelming mutual attraction that occurs between two individuals, while subtly critiquing the traditional notion of an arranged marriage.

Rama’s Insistence on Sita’s purity, a patriarchal flaw

While the story reflects the importance of couple love as a mechanism for universal good, it has at least one major flaw — Rama’s patriarchal attitude, his insistence on Sita’s purity.

Muse-driven: Quieting the Mind, Listening to my Little Voice & Following her Directive.

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